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CHE 101 - Applied Chemistry
 
Syllabus:    Spring 2014               M Lawliss Home
 
 
 
Textbook:        Timberlake, K.  Chemistry an Introduction to General,
                                    Organic and Biochemistry, 10th or 11th  Edition (Prentice Hall).
 
Instructor:       Michael Lawliss   office Rm 221T
                        college number 562-4337 (call any time to leave voice mail)
                        I will be available the hour before class on most days.
                        e-mail:  Michael.Lawliss@clinton.edu
                                     
Course Description  This is a basic chemistry course appropriate for non-science majors, elementary education majors, and students in pre-nursing. Students learn basic concepts and the vocabulary used in chemistry as well as how to apply concepts to quantitative problems. The topics include measurement, atoms, molecules, mass, energy, naming compounds, acids and bases and basic organic chemistry concepts. (Students receiving credit for CHE 111 cannot receive credit for this course.)
 
Prerequisites:  Eng 094 and MAT 100 or equivalent. Co-Requisite:  ENG 101
 
Class break downAny class period can be used to work in the lab.  I will often split up the lecture times with some kind of hands-on activity.
  Cell Phones/ Disruptive Activities: It is preferable that you not use your cell phone in class. If you are expecting a call due to an extenuating circumstance, please let me know in advance. The rule to remember is to not disrupt the class.
Assignments:  Assignments are due at the beginning of class.  Most homework will not be graded.  Any late assignments including lab write-ups can be penalized 10% per day late.
 
Quizzes & Tests:  There will be 3 major tests, quizzes, homework assignments, 2 research assignments and 4 lab write- ups. As a rule test make-ups will not be given.
 
Attendance:    the college allows a 15% missed attendance before an automatic withdrawal slip can be filled out.  In the case of an absence give prior notification when possible and work must be made up.
 
Final Grade:   The letter equivalents are:
 
A  =  90 100
B  =  83 86        
C+ =  77 79 
C- =  70 72
D  =  60 66 
B+ =  87 89
B- =  80 82
C  =  73 76
D+ =  67 69
F =  Below 60 
                                                Exams & Oral Pres  50%;   Quizzes, Papers, Lab write ups & other assignments   50%
 
Class Projects:  One Critical Research Paper must be completed
                          One 10 minute Oral Presentation to the class must be completed.
                         
Labs:   You will be expected to write four formal lab reports, each being graded progressively harder.  The goal is for you to be able to complete a well written report by the end of the semester. 
A LAB NOTEBOOK will be required. A bound composition notebook is required. Reports may be required for each exercise, but formal reports will be due no sooner than the week after completion of the exercise.
     
A CCC student should expect that any class may require some course activity that uses a computer and the internet.  Activities could include but are not limited to accessing the course syllabus, schedule, or other handouts on a website, completing homework online, taking quizzes or submitting written work, participating in a discussion or sending/receiving email
 
If you have, or suspect you may have, any type of disability or learning problem that may require extra assistance or special accommodations, please speak to me privately after class or during my office hours as soon as possible so I can help you obtain any assistance you may need to successfully complete this course.
 
WRITING AND GENERAL EDUCATION:
The college is committed to and has adopted a writing policy for writing across the curriculum. We will do writing assignments in this class to help you improve your writing and your critical thinking skills. The general education goals that are met by this course are listed at the end of the syllabus with the specific goals of the course.
 
 
ACADEMIC HONESTY WILL BE EXPECTED AND ENFORCED, PLAGIARISM CAN RESULT IN AN F FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OR EVEN AN F FOR THE COURSE.  Unless noted all work turned in will be presented as your own.  Lab reports must be individual efforts, though data and graphs can be identical, the remainder of the lab text must be original.
 
COURSE CONTINUITY PLAN: In the case that the college officially closes because of an emergency which causes a short term disruption of this course, we will utilize e-mail to continue this course in the short term (1-3 weeks).  All students need to utilize their campus e-mail to receive course related information.
 
ALL SAFETY REGULATIONS WILL BE FOLLOWED OR YOU WILL NOT BE PERMITTED INTO THE LABORATORY.
 
YOU MUST BE PRESENT TO GET CREDIT FOR THE LABORATORY. YOU MUST WEAR SAFETY GLASSES AT ALL TIMES IN THE LABORATORY. YOU MUST PROVIDE YOUR OWN SAFETY GLASSES. YOU WILL BE DISMISSED FROM THE LABORATORY WITH NO CREDIT IF YOU BREAK THIS RULE.
 
 At the end of the semester you should have mastered the following concepts
 
SUNY GENERAL EDUCATION KNOWLEDGE AREA LEARNING OUTCOMES:
 
Students will demonstrate the ability to:
 
1.     understand the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including:
  observation
  hypothesis development
  measurement and data collection
  experimentation
  evaluation of evidence
  employment of mathematical analysis
 
2.  apply scientific data, concepts and models in one of the natural sciences
   

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
1. Calculate an initial unit of measurement to another unit using conversion factors from the unit of an equality.
         Understanding the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical analysis.
         Convert an initial unit of measurement to another unit.
         Identify conversion factors from the units in an equality.
         Calculate density of a substance.
         Convert between mass and volume using density.
2. Describe the characteristics of an element using the periodic table and the relationship between electron arrangement, group number and periodic law.
         Explain the relationship between electron arrangement, group number and periodic law
         Identify an element and the characteristics of an element using the periodic table
         Identify number of protons, neutrons, and electrons in an atom using the periodic table.
         Isotopes
3.  Determine the correct formulas for ionic and covalent compounds and balance a chemical equation.
         Identify elements and compounds in a chemical formula.
         Write the correct formulas for ionic and covalent compounds.
         Name ionic and covalent compounds.
         Write a balanced equation for a chemical reaction.
4.  Determine the mole/mass relationships in chemical equations using principles of stoichiometry.
         Determine the molar mass of a compound from its formula.
         Convert between grams of a substance and number of moles using molar mass.
         Use mole conversion factors to determine number of moles for a reactant or product.
         Calculate the mass of a reactant or product using a given mass of a substance in a reaction and appropriate mole factor and molar masses.
5.  Describe physical properties of solids, liquids, and gases and the energy involved with changes of states in matter.
         Identify the physical properties of three states of matter.
         Describe the changes of state between solids, liquids, and gases.
         Calculate the energy involved with changes of states in matter.
6.  Calculate pressure, volume, temperature, or moles using the appropriate gas law.
         Describe the kinetic molecular theory of gases.
         Describe the units of measurement used for pressure, volume, temperature, or moles of a specific amount of gas.
         Calculate pressure, volume, or temperature using the appropriate gas law
7.  Identify the solute and solvent and calculate the concentration in a solution.
         Identify solute and solvent in a solution.
         Describe hydrogen bonding.
         Calculate concentration of a solution.
         Describe hypotonic, isotonic, and hypertonic solutions.
8.  Identify conjugate acid-base pairs for an acid base reaction and determine the strength of an acid or base using the pH scale.
         Identify an acid and base in a reaction.
         Identify a solution as acidic, basic, or neutral using the pH scale.
         Calculate concentration of hydronium and hydroxide ions using the ion product of water.
         Calculate pH from the hydronium or hydroxide ions in solution.
         Identify conjugate-acid-base pairs for an acid base reaction.
9.  Describe the properties that are characteristics of organic compounds
         Describe the properties that are characteristic of organic compounds
       Name and draw Akanes, Alkenes and Alkynes
         Identify types of organic compounds by their functional groups.
 

 


Contact info:

Room 221 Stafford Center for Art, Science and Technology
Clinton Community College
136 Clinton Pt. Dr.
Plattsburgh, NY 12901
                                                                   518-562-4337

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